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very easily. >>> author of numerous books on abraham lincoln recalls the four months between president lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are wat
penceble to preserve it. this approach was dictated in lincoln's mind by two assumptions. first lincoln assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but afte
historians have spent years poring through the letters and evidence for this book on lincoln or the hundreds on washington. so my thought was eureka, why not look at the person and ask him the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady has these words he had ruled a trade ignoring mistresses in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certainly they didn't do any such matters manchester is that they are not dedicated under educated matters of the heart. by studying the first lady, for example the first and thomas jefferson did, after spending 13 days and it lost outside of philadelphia bred in the declaration of independence, he went shopping for his wife. he mr. she was preggers. she had a miscarriage and game mastering batterson gloves. then he begged off from serving the rest of the summer so he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there besides george washington, suffering through the freezing weather was martha washington with her white on at cannes. s
on the bible of martin luther king and abraham lincoln, as he re-enacts the oath of office from the capitol this morning. there it is right there. what a magnificent sight it is. robin, i know you're watching from home today. i wish you could be down here with us. we cannot wait to have you back. the whole gang is in new york, as well. we'll be covering the inauguration all day long on abc news. josh elliott out on the mall right now. josh, you've been tracking the celebrations all weekend long. what do you have right now? >> i'm actually here on pennsylvania avenue, veritably, in the shadow of the capitol, as the parade makes its way past. barack obama and the presidency, the realization of the dual dream of dr. king and abraham lincoln. he'll be using those two bibles when he takes the public oath of office, again, all leading to a remarkable day here on the national mall. overnight, the president attended the first event of his second term, a candlelight reception. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. >> reporter: where
touches on it. >> we were talking about a lot of references to the 701 words by abraham lincoln. >> first of all, and there are not a heck of a lot of second inaugural addresses out there. lincoln's definitely stand out. possibly george w. bush. so much has happened in his first term. it was such a different picture international arena than it was at the beginning of his first term. >> the second inaugural address was longer than the first. >> we have quite a challenge with president clinton. the second address was rather long. he had a way with the audience. i think he made up for it with his delivery. he was very captivating with people. i think inaugural addresses and typically tended to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity. it is that a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. it is much more rhetorical and poetic. >> the president will deliver his state of union address. >> that will be his policy agenda. it will also be a speech that makes a lot more news than the inaugural address. the inaugural address kind of comes and goes. the
have to pick one item it may be this the famed lincoln bible the actual one touched by the hands of lincoln and barack obama. >> this bibe is as ordinary as it could possibly be. it is family bible printed by ox nard university press. it is a little dressed up because it is a family bible but it is a very ordinary 19th century bible until lincoln put his hands on it. >> but he didn't keep it. it got to the library of congress which will be on display for a few weeks next to lincoln's inaugural address. if you would like to see the lincoln bible you can do so for a limited time. it will go on display two days after the inauguration. next wednesday at the library of congress. it will remain on display until february 18 which is president's day. as far as the exhibit here at the museum it only runs through january 27. >> very nice. thank you so much. coming up here at 5:00, a big comeback at the box office. we're going to hear what arch campbell thinks about arnold schwarzenegger's comeback. >> the man accused of killing his girlfriend and his young
laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
of this morning's swearing-in ceremony and its ties to president lincoln.  >>> welcome back. today, of course, the national holiday honoring dr. martin luther king, jr. a wreath laying ceremony was held on sunday at the memorial for the civil rights leader on the national mall. among the dignitaries and celebrities on hand were martin luther king iii, reverends alsharpton and jesse jackson. sharpton called the dr. king day and inauguration weekend and intersection of history. what a nice day it was outside for that too. got up to like 61,. >> yesterday was gorgeous. >> certainly not what we expected. >> i think everybody was presently expected to the up side on yesterday's daytime high. it was a good 10 degrees warmer than most of the forecasts were expecting. today will be in the mid-40s. if you are leaving had head downtown in the next hour or two, it is cold. temperature have fallen back in the mid-30s. check out dulles and bwi marshall. both freezing or even colder. going to an an interesting day. i think we'll start the day with some sunshine. as we get into the afterno
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
inaugural addresses and a lot of references to lincoln's second saturday much more famous than his first address but that is the exception. guest: i suppose it is. there aren't a lot of inaugural addresses out there. but lincoln's definitely stands out. i'm trying to think offhand whose president's second inaugural address resinated more than the first. possibly my president, george bush. because it was such a different picture at the second term than at the beginning of his first. host: both of you bush, 43, president blin's second inaugural address was longer than the first. guest: yes, we had quite a challenge with president clinton. as most people know, he tends to like to speak long. the second address was rather long but, you know, he had a way with the audience and i think he made up for it with the delivery and he was captivating with people. although, i think a normal address typically tend to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity, it is not a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. so, you know, it is more rhetorical and poetic
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
to touch lincoln's bible. >>> we have got fog this morning -- just kidding. that was last sunday. no fogfest here. did i trick you, chuck? >> don't scare me. we have been baby sitting the forecast very carefully with everybody coming into town, and with the fog bank last week i don't want to hear the word "fog" for a while. and for early morning joggers and walkers and people heading out to the services, temperatures are in the 30s near 40 degrees, and very mild by january standards. and a breeze has windchills in the low to mid-30s, and there's a touch of bundle up factor and not all that cold. and up in the low 50s for a time today, we will see clouds on the increase and it's going to be a breezy day today. cold front number one, that will be the breeze and the beginning of the cooldown. how much cooler? may see snow flurries on the parade tomorrow ahead of the true arctic air. our coldest air in more than two years coming our way for the rest of the week coming up. >>> right now, getting around the district is not difficult but that will change in the next 24 hours. here is a
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic note he'll s
: and abraham lincoln's, delivered to a nation divided by civil war. >> with malice toward none, with charity for all. >> reporter: a third theme, renewing our commitment to the values of our founding fathers. perhaps it's surprising the president found inspiration in the words of this former a adversa adversary. >> there can be no human rights without human liberty. >> reporter: aides tell us that, although the president disagrees with mr. bush's policy, he's moved by the speech's democratic principles. >> freedom by its nature must be chosen and defended by citizens. >> reporter: a message, aides say, the president will echo today, as he did at the white house last week. >> that most fundamental set of rights, to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> reporter: of all his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white ho
in abraham lincoln's inauguration another belonging to dr. martin luther king jr. who we honor today. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did
special significance. it's the one that president abraham lincoln took the oath on back in 1861. president obama also used it during his last inauguration. the lincoln bible will be on display at the library of congress from january 23rd through february 18th. today the president will also use a bible that belonged to dr. martin luther king jr.. >> very historic bibles there. pretty amazing. pretty good moment in history there we have a front row seat for. happy to be here today covering the 57th presidential inauguration. lauren is at freedom plaza today. she is having a different vantage point of today's ceremony down there with the folks ready to see the parade when it goes by later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. i'm happy to be here as well particularly since the sun came out. want to talk about the history of the inaugural parade. the first one taking place for the first president george washington back in 1789. that was held in new york. the first inaugural parade here was in 1801 for thomas jefferson. the first to ever be held on tv, that was for president truman i
to president lincoln and dr. king president obama wants to remind the nation of its traditions. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. >> reporter: now today is a day of service in honor of dr. king. monday, the swearing in, the celebration, and then when the party's over after the inaugural balls on monday night, it will be back to the same battles and the hope that it won't be just business as usual. rebecca, anthony? >> bill plante at the white house. thank you, bill. >>> while the president's opponents are observing the traditional truths to the inauguration, can president obama hope for a new term. let's talk with debbie wassermann schultz. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> congresswoman, let me ask you. we heard from theepublicans on extending the debt ceiling for at least a three-month period. is this any signs of hope in terms of cooperation or more maneuvering? >> i think this unfortunately more a sign that republicans realize it was horribly damaging to them to continue to
of office with his hand on two bibles, one used by abraham lincoln at his inauguration in 1861, and the other a bible which belonged to dr. king. the first covered in velvet and trimmed with gold was loned to lincoln by supreme court clerk william thomas carroll. a seal inside the cover marks the occasion. in the king bible, king noted the dates of sermons he had given. bernice king the youngest of his four children said it was his fawct's traveling bible. >> he used it to study and meditate, not just to speak and preach but just to prepare himself to be able to lead. >> reporter: in a video released by the inaugural committee, president obama calls the lincoln and king bibles a fitting choice. >> their actions, the movements they represented are the only reason that it's possible for me to be inaugurated. >> reporter: turns out that five other presidents have also used two bibles at their swearing in. typically one family wiebl and another of historical significance. eisenhower carter, and george h.w. bush all used george washington's inaugural bible which belonged to the firs
area also includes around the reflecting pool and the lincoln memorial and several blocks to franklin and mcpherson square. if you are coming monday morning, get here early and have a plan. reporting live, john gonzalez abc 7 news. >> thousands of national guard soldiers and airmen from 25 states and territories arriving in d.c. today to help with the security and some of the other duties during the inauguration. they will be processed at the d.c. armory this morning. the 6000 strong force will help with traffic controls, cladistics, crowd management and other areas. stay with abc 7 for complete coverage of the inauguration. you will find lots of information on our website all you have to do is click on the inauguration of 2013 tab. >> d.c. residents are voicing their opposition to a school closure plant protesters. rallied thursday outside school chancellor kaya henderson's house. they want a moratorium on the closures which will affect 2500 students. the district plans to close 15 schools with low attendance. the students will have to transfer to neighboring schools. ander
bibles for the public swearing in ceremony. this one is president abraham lincoln's bible when he was sworn in, in 1861. he will use martin luther king jr. personal bible. it has extra significance in this inauguration because it's happening on the federal holiday that honors the civil rights leader. both bibles will be stacked on top of each other. in the first inauguration, the president used the lincoln bible as well. martin luther king jr.'s bible, it was his traveling bible when he would go places to make speeches. he would take that bible with him. he'd be able to study from that bible and pull verses if he wanted to insert things into speeches. >> how is that having your hand on the bible used by lincoln and martin luther king jr. >> absolutely. >> the first family observed martin luther king jr. day on saturday with a day of service, of course. >> with thousands of others. >>> if you're planning to go to the national mall, plan on leaving plenty of extra time. >> you're going to need it. security will be tight for everybody downtown for the event. news 4's megan mcgrath li
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
the quite remarkable book, april 1865 about lincoln's last days and inauguration is with us here. real quickly, jay, before the president comes out and the vice president, second inaugurations, what is special about them? >> it is special because it marks the continuing of a second term. of course we think of abraham lincoln's masterpiece second inaugural which inspired all americans of his day. i think really it's a day of humility. george washington put it best. he said after taking the oath of office my hand trembles but my heart does not. i think that pretty much sums it up. >> his was the shortest inaugural address, first ever, 135 words. lincoln's was only 700 words in 1865. a lot of people think it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. >> it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. the nation was in the throes of a civil war. lincoln was exhausted. before he gave the speech he spent time in the capitol signing bills. there was a lot to work to be done. >> with malice toward none and charity for all. obviously the civil war was about to end and he was ver
washington, jefferson, and lincoln. both a message of humility and of inspiration to someone taking the oath of office for president. >> this is now the biden family. the biden brothers who have been a campaign concert with their father the other night when he was at the iowa ball. he said he was proud to be president of the united states meng corrected himself and said he is proud to be vice president of the united states. it is said that he does want to be president and he will throw his hat into the ring as soon as this gets underway. >> there are a couple of people who are likely to throw their hats in the ring, including mrs. clinton. they have used this family bible and all the swearing sin and his family. president obama we used to buy votes. i think history should note i saw one of the people on the stand who was jay-z. the first time that he has been on the inaugural stanford presidential inauguration. [laughter] also beyonce will be performing and james taylor and kelly clarkson. megyn: i'd like to take that back. you can start from scratch. but can you get through the rest of the
spoke them. abraham lincoln with malice toward none, charity for all, let us strive to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation's wounds. john f. kennedy asked not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are s
that president l lincoln used. >> you're going to see a president that wants to work across party lines to get things done. i think that's what the country wants. >> reporter: of course, you have the parade and the two big inaugural balls. but when it comes to the actual ceremony this morning, the crowd is not expected to be as large as it was during the 2009 inauguration, when they had 1.8 million people in attendance. reporting live in washington, d.c., brandi hitt, abc news. rob and sunny, back to you. >> still going to be a raucous crowd. i'm glad you mentioned my ex-girlfriend, beyonce. in addition to her, tell me more about some of the other big stars coming out tonight. >> reporter: when it comes to the inaugural ceremony here after beyonce sings the national anthem, you'll hear from james taylor, who we heard from during the democratic national convention and kelly clarkson will be performing. then at the inaugural ball, alicia keys, your other former girlfriend, rob. and then also you'll be hearing from other acts like brad paisley. >> brandi, i was there four years ago and there was
lincoln. when harry truman was worrying about firing mcarthur, he's reading about mcclellan, what did lincoln do about mcclellan. you think about your own life, learn from your own experiences. he will have learned from this fist term an enormous set of things to take with him to the second term, strengthed and weaknesses. but you can learn from all these guys before you, like learning from your grandparents and great grandparents. great when a president cares about history. >> give me a measure, michael, of how much this president is attuned to history, how much it plays a part of his lady life. i know i've read he tries to find up to three hours a day and night between 9:00 and midnight to read. >> he is above all a writer, so not surprising given what this is his day job is. but, you know, i think the most revealing thing was just after the election he gave that press conference and was asked about second terms. you remember? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term ove
said he really drew inspiration from dr. king and abraham lincoln for today's speech, ed. >> that's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about a
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
goodwin later on. what is the chance he doesn't quote lincoln's second inaugural? >> i would be shocked if lincoln is not quoted. i would be shocked if specific issues aren't mentioned. that doesn't mean he isn't going to talk about newtown. but as far as talking about guns and gun control, he's got a state of the union in three weeks. advisers continue to remind us of that. hey, this is not a laundry list of things he wants to get done. yes, he has a small window. i think savannah is right, i think we'll be able to judge by the fourth of july of this year, has he gotten one of his gun proposals passed through congress, is immigration done? all of those things, if he can get them done, probably need to get done by the summer. but today's speech knot for that. that's that state of the union which takes place in three weeks. >> all right. chuck todd in front of reviewing stand. we want to show you, especially those just joining us the kind of calendar of events, the schedule upcoming. right now, the president is hosting congressional leaders inside the white house for a kind of traditiona
figures i admire probably more than anybody in american history is dr. king and president lincoln. for me to have the opportunity to use the bible they used on the 105th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington is fitting. their actions and the movement they represent are the only reason that it is possible for me to be inaugurated. it is also a reminder for me that this country has gone through tough times before but we always come out on the other side. we're constantly perfecting our union and making it more fair. we want everybody to have a fair shot in this country. if you work hard, you can make it. regardless of where you come from or what you look like. it is probably the most important thing to keep in mind when you are president of the united states. i will uphold my oath of office at the same time letting me remind people of the sacrifices of the past. from the presidential inaugural committee host: first lady michelle obama just turned 49 last week. she will have a big role during the next couple of days. here is take twe
luther king jr. and the other abraham lincoln. supreme court justice warren vice- president joe biden for his second term >> the joseph biden jr. solemn we swear that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states >> he also unofficially took the oath of office yesterday. president obama expressed hope for the future in his inaugural address. he called for fidelity to our founding principles. while also increasing your responses to new challenges. >> a decade of war is now ending. ifan economic recovery has begun. we possess all of the >> hughes in drive. diversity and open this. endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. >> the president will be presenting more details of his second term policy goals. he said the nation must confront the needs of a rising middle class. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid, these things did not stab our nation a strengthen us. they did not make us a nation of takers. a free us to take the risk that makes this country great. >> for a reaction we're joined by frank holland. >> the n
crisis. we talked about abraham lincoln's second inaugural while the civil war was still going on. we talk about f.d.r.'s "we have nothing to fear." the great depression was on and unemployment with such staggeringly high numbers so this is a time where people have felt improvement since president obama came? we have to remember the crash of the economy stock market in such terrible shape. it's been a progressive incrementalism. but i have to say this speech is part of a progressive tradition of a theodore roosevelt speech in kansas where barack obama in 1911 when -- in 2011 he went and if you read the t.r. speech "the new nationalism" you'll find hit in the speech he gave today. you'll find it at f.d.r.'s second inaugural and in many of martin luther king's speeches. people talk about kennedy's inaugural about swords and switchbacks. it's a technique that worked brilliantly for john f. kennedy but i think the president had caught the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very muc
for being with us. the most memorable second term address was by abraham lincoln. guest: people think that it outranked the gettysburg address. i would say it is the greatest lay sermon delivered in america. anyone who questioned his spirituality, read the second inaugural. it is a remarkable address. it is not a celebratory speech. at that point, the war is almost over. the most obvious thing to do would be some congratulations. host: with malice toward none. guest: that is the magnanimous side. until the crime of human slavery was removed from the american landscape, the united states would not be right with god. it is an extraordinarily spiritual address. lincoln was looking ahead to reconstruction. host: this morning in the "new york times," the historian one of a number of people offering advice for the president's second speech. guest: i would not offer advice to the president. the second inaugural is one of the more inaugurable addresses. i see a country one-third ill clothed, ill fed. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address.
political hero's bible, abraham lincoln. >> after his inauguration speech, the president and first lady will make the traditional walk down pennsylvania avenue toward the white house. >> ahead of today's ceremonies, the president and first lady made the rounds in washington. they told a crowd that the celebrations are about the country and its citizens, not the election results. also vice president joe biden and his family greeted supporters at the latino inaugural party. >> hundreds of thousands are gathering on the national mall to see history being made. >> and while officials say right now there is no credible threat, security, as you can imagine, is once again extremely tight. >> reporter: they will be everywhere, snipers dotting roof tops, the coast guard patrolling waterways, military fighter jets enforcing a no-fly zone. 13,000 security personnel blanketing the washington mall. >> protecting an event this large, this complex with this number of people coming requires a lot of coordination and a lot of organization. >> reporter: all coordinating here. the multiagency communicatio
is the marking of that day, mlk day, and one of abraham lincoln. how do you see this moment in the context of that struggle because that was resonant and poignant, wasn't it? >> it was very powerful, and keep in mind he said something, martin, that tied it all together. he said that we realized long ago that we could not survive and thrive as half slave state and half free. and basically i think what he was saying is we've come a long way, and i think he showed what lincoln did to make the country stronger, again having a vision of what we could do, and then i think he tried to use that to say, okay, now a lot has happened in between those times. we still face difficulties, but let's, again, be inspired by the aspiration of those who came before us so that each person could pursue happiness, you know, life, liberty, and property, and do it in a way that made sense. so i really think -- as i listened to chris, i couldn't help but think of a note i wrote while the president was speaking. i wrote the president is not trying to take us to common ground but take us to higher ground, to higher g
was issued by president abraham lincoln, january 1, 1863. one of the most influential documents that declared all persons held as slaves within the confederate territory are here for and henceforth held free. i just want to go on record publicly acknowledging 150 years. that is quite an accomplishment. today's actually the 84th anniversary of doctor martin luther king's birth. many people know who doctor king was, a clergyman, activist, husband, father, the most prominent promoter of nonviolence and civil disobedience; he received the nobel peace prize in 1964 in recognition of his nonviolence. only we discussing assault weapons ban ammunitions but acknowledging that today would have been doctor martin luther king's 84th birthday, a very prolific activist. i would like to recognize and former city employee and decorated soldier mr. hillyer terry, born june 4, 1923. while attending college he was drafted to serve in world war ii; he served the united states army from 1943 to 1946 where he received an honorable discharge; he was awarded the american theater campaign medal; the eaim ca
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